Tag Archives: travel

Polson Montana and Glacier National Park!

It has been six months since I updated this site, and I don’t even know where to start!  First of all, we are still on the road.  We love this lifestyle and have been enjoying a ton of adventures.  With three websites and a growing pattern business, I have had to put this travel website on the back burner.  But over the next few weeks, I am going to make an honest attempt to get it caught up.

We are currently in Polson, Montana, where we have been working at the KOA.  First, let me just say that this particular campground is by far one of the most beautiful that we have worked at.

Our campsite has an amazing view of Flathead Lake and the Mission Mountains.  When we arrived here in May, there was still plenty of snow on the mountains and a chill in the air.

This is a privately owned campground, run by a couple who have owned it for the past 18 years.  They have been a pleasure to work for and as campgrounds go, it has been a great season.  I am working at the front desk, and Dave is working outside maintenance.

We had a gathering yesterday to celebrate a great season here at the Polson KOA. These are some of our workamping coworkers. From right to left- Roger(Gator Bait), his wife Tina (Bear Bait), Chuck (Cue Ball), his wife Connie (Precious), me and Whiskey Dave.

It is wonderful to have a crew that works so well together! We will miss them all when we hit the road in a couple of weeks.

We had promised ourselves that our next campground would be small and privately owned and it was a great choice after some of the larger ones that we have worked in the past few years.

Glacier National Park

As with any of our previous workcamping jobs, we always play the tourist on our weekends off.  So, our first tourist stop had to be Glacier National Park.

The park is located about an hour and a half from the campground, so a day trip was needed to begin exploring it.  Our plan was to drive the “Going to the Sun” Road through the center of the park. The Going-to-the-Sun Road was completed in 1932 and is a spectacular 50 mile, paved two-lane highway that bisects the park east and west.

It spans the width of Glacier National Park, crossing the Continental Divide at 6,646-foot-high Logan Pass, and passes through almost every type of terrain in the park along the way.  Scenic viewpoints and pullouts line the road to allow you to stop when you would like.

The road is one of the most difficult roads in North America to snowplow in the spring. We were told that up to 80 feet of snow can lie on top of Logan Pass.  And all of that needs to be plowed each spring to allow access to the road.

The road takes about ten weeks to plow.  This year, the road did not fully open until nearly July 4th weekend!

We made one more trip to Glacier National Park in the beginning of August right before the Fire season began, and I have a whole other batch of photos to show you of that area.

We had planned on going back one more time before our contract ends here in mid September, and travel the Going to the Sun road in the opposite direction.  Unfortunately, that may not happen at this time. You see, Fire season is in full force right now and part of the road is closed now due to a large fire in the park.

We are hoping that the cooler weather and a bit of rain and snow over the past couple weeks will calm the fire down enough before we leave.

Stay tuned for more sights of beautiful Montana!

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The 5 Most Epic US Travel Destinations of 2018

This is a Guest Post from Kyle Rutten.  I will have more updates this week!

The United States has a wealth of world class travel destinations fit for any personality. There are stops with amazing history and culture, jaw-dropping protected wilderness reserves, and completely unique and quiet getaways spots. Whatever your sensibilities, you can find an amazing vacation without having to leave the country. In this article, we’ll break down some of our favorite spots of the year to help get your gears turning on your next adventure. Let’s dive in.

1. The Rolling Destination: Colorado RV Trip

If you want to maximize novelty, an RV trip is the perfect way to do so. In fact, putting ourselves in a novel environment trips a circuit in our brain that evolved to increase focus and creative thinking in order to improve survival when we’re on the move. It’s this effect that makes so many of us love travel, because of the “feeling” we get. The best way to maximize that feeling is to maximize the novelty we experience.

Hence, an RV trip. You can fly into Denver and rent a rig from one of the premier, privately owned Colorado RV dealers in the area. From here, head west for the trip of a lifetime. About an hour up I-70 you’ll find yourself surrounded by countless adventure options.

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Hiking, camping, rock climbing, rafting, zip-lining, fishing, kayaking, and so on. If you are looking for the most action in one trip, this is the way to do it.

2. Take a Retreat in a Tree House

If you’re looking for some quiet time to recharge rather than nonstop action, go chill in a treehouse for a few days. Treehouse Point in Fall City, Washington is one of several tree house getaways in the United States.

There are yoga classes and numerous hiking trails to enjoy. Or you can cozy up with a book and let yourself decompress. The area is surrounded by pacific northwest greenery that will calm the worst of nerves. If you’re looking for a reset in your life, this is the place to be.

3. Rad History: Dry Tortugas National Park

On a tiny island off the coast of Key West Florida you can find Dry Tortugas National Park. Within the park is the extremely unexpected Jefferson Fort. A massive, 16 acre brick fortress that takes up the entire island it resides on.

The fort was a controversial build during the early days of our country, with some experts seeing the location as completely unfit for a naval installation. However, the decision was made to construct the base in order to secure the area for merchant vessels. It was believed that merchant vessels in the area were mission critical to the survival of the union at this time.

Whether you are into history, or just want a bit of the island charm, the Florida Keys are a must see.

4. Every Night’s a Party in New Orleans

If nightlife is your thing, it’s hard to find a better place than The French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana. Every night, Bourbon Street comes alive with jazz, blues, hip hop, folk and other genres of high-energy live music. Drinks are always at the ready, and the open container laws of the town make the place feel like the party simply never stops.

During the day, there is also plenty to take in here, including some of the best food you will ever put in your face.

Pro Tip: Forget about your diet in New Orleans and eat as much as humanly possible.

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5. Nature’s Grand Finale, Autumn Colors in the San Juans

Every year as the Rocky Mountains make their preparations for winter, millions of Colorado aspen trees turn a vibrant gold. The spectacle attracts tourists from all over the world and is truly a sight to behold.

The perfect hidden gem for witnessing this phenomenon is taking a ride on the Durango to Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad. Enjoy a charming ride in an enclosed rail car, with food and drink available. The train winds through 45 miles of some of the most stunning wilderness Colorado has to offer. Time the trip right, and you’ll get to see a sea of aspen trees bursting with their seasonal gold. It’s a ride you will not soon forget.

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The United States is a difficult place to top in terms of travel options. No matter what kind of activities you enjoy, there is always a place you’ll love. Travel is an important way to gain a fresh perspective in life and touch that ever-elusive feeling of joy and meaning.

It’s for this reason that we are firm believers that you shouldn’t wait to “find” time to travel, but rather “make” it. Hopefully this article has inspired you to get out there and have an adventure, the world is waiting!

Kyle Rutten is a freelance content creator for B&B RV located in Denver, Colorado.  In his free time, he enjoys hiking, exploring the wilderness and taking advantage of the active lifestyle that Colorado’s mountainous terrain offers.

Apache Trail and Tortilla Flat- Beautiful Arizona

It’s been a busy season here in Apache Junction and with my new Social Media Director job, and six websites to maintain, I’m afraid I’ve fallen behind here on The Traveling Sitcom.  We will be here in Arizona for five more weeks and I hope to catch up on at least the highlights of this beautiful area over the next few weeks.

We are going to start with the amazingly beautiful Apache Trail.

Yes, we are finding the time to explore.  After all, that is why we went into full timing in the first place.  The Apache Trail and Tortilla Flat were first on our list of must sees.  And apparently we liked them because we have driven this route several times now.

Named after the Apache Indians who once used this route,  the Apache Trail, or AZ 88 as it is officially known, links Apache Junction with Theodore Roosevelt Lake,  traveling through the Superstition Mountains and the Tonto National Forest.

Known as one of the ten most dangerous roads in Arizona, we had to check it out.

But before we hit the actual trail, we made one stop…

Tortilla Flat

Tortilla Flat was originally a freight camp, home to a small community for years. Only a small part of the town remains, but what’s left is touristy Old West.

The town, population six, is Arizona’s smallest town with a post office as well as a voter’s precinct.

Quite literally, Tortilla Flat is just a wide spot in the road.  But we had heard a lot about it from those that visit here every year.  We were told to try the hamburgers at the restaurant there.  They were supposed to be epic.

Hamburgers, you say?  Well, we certainly needed to check that out.  I mean sometimes you have to make a few sacrifices in the name of tourism.

Walking into the Superstition Saloon and Restaurant is an adventure in itself.  The first thing you see (besides the kitchy saddle barstools) are thousands and thousands of dollar bills on every single wall and ceiling in the place.  According to our waiter, over 500,000 in dollar bills.

Interesting enough, this saloon was rebuilt after the 1987 fire which destroyed almost the entire town.   At that time, the saloon had been blanketed with dollar bills that burned with the building.

The tradition has lived on.

Okay, I’m sure you are wanting to know about the burger.  Yes, it was awesome.  We will be back.

The rest of Tortilla Flat consists of an old one-room school house, an ice cream parlor, two gift shops and a post office.

We tried out the Prickly Pear Gelato before we left town.  An interesting flavor, similar to strawberry, but not as strong.  Not sure I’d get it again, but I can now say I had it.

And now to check out Apache Trail!

 

Armed with our maps and our sturdy KIA Soul, we ventured onward, determined to get a taste of this road that we had heard so much about.  We had pavement for a few miles past Tortilla Flat until we got to mile marker #220.

And then our adventure began.

We passed a scenic lake, took a few photos and at this point were not too intimidated by the road ahead.

And then the hairpin turns and the switchbacks began.  Our little KIA climbed and climbed.  Rail guards were few and far between and in most instances as we climbed the narrow road, there was nothing between us and the edge of the cliff but a few feet of dusty road.

It may seem a little late to mention this, but your car should be in good working order before taking this trip. This is not an area that you want to break down in.  There are also restrictions on size and weight of vehicles on the Apache Trail. It is not recommended for RVs.

Our little KIA was not informed of this ahead of time.  We didn’t want it to freak out.

You see, there is no cell phone coverage here, and very little traffic.  Which is good in a way because the road is so narrow and every blind corner is an adventure in itself.

But the amazing scenery is worth the journey!  Every inch of it.  The forty mile route took us about 4 hours.  By the time we got to Roosevelt Dam, it was nearly dark.  And our KIA was no longer silver.  More of a muddy brown.

We have since taken this trip two more times.  The Apache Trail is a definite must do if you are in the area.  Put aside a day and check it out.

Motorcycling the Desert

Another thing that has been keeping us busy this season is motorcycling with a group from the resort.  Turns out there are lots here that have motorcycles and about once a week somebody organizes a ride.

It’s the most use our motorcycle has gotten since we hit the road three years ago.

The desert offers so much to see.  I honestly never get tired of looking at the beautiful vistas.

I have lots more to show you and hope to share it over the next few weeks, so stay tuned!

 

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Boston Pizza and Beer Tour!

Well, we’ve been in the Boston Cape Cod area for about a month now.  Life has been busy and with a full time job at the campground, we are still managing to get out once a week to see the area. The beaches are incredibly crowded this time of year and we will have to wait until September to truly check them out.

In the meantime, we decided to get a first hand look at the City of Boston with a fun Boston Pizza and Beer Tour.  Because I simply can’t think of too many things better than pizza and beer.  What a great way to check out Boston!

According to the locals, the best way to get around Boston is by subway.  The rail system through the city is quite extensive and is a great way to avoid traffic, honking cars and irate drivers.

It may be my imagination, but it seems like everyone here is a very aggressive driver.  Stop signs are just suggestions, cross walks mean take your life in your hands, and they just love to honk horns.

So with that in mind, we took the red line into Boston.  Our destination was North Boston, the oldest part of the city.  Parking at the subway station was just $7 for the day and two round tip tickets was about $11.

Our destination?  The North End!

The North End, Boston’s oldest neighborhood, was settled in 1630. It is also known as Little Italy, and Italian is still spoken in the streets.  Visitors flock to the North End largely to eat. Within the 1 square mile of The North End, there are around 100 restaurants and bakeries to choose from.

There was a huge Farmers Market which made me instantly wish I had brought the car rather than taken the subway.  Prices were amazing and the fruits and vegetables were beautiful.

We would definitely be back another time with the car.

We were told to check out Bova Bakery.  And of course had to buy a couple of Cannolis.  I mean, how can you walk by a bakery and not stop?

Bova Bakery is actually open 24 hours, so if you get a hankering for a Cannoli or baked good in the middle of the night, they have your back.

The North  End was beautiful.  Not only was there lots of historic buildings to see, but a new park with fountains and a carousel.

After looking around a bit, we met up with our guide for the Pizza and Beer Tour.

The Boston Pizza and Beer Tour is a walking tour that takes you through the North End, Charlestown Navy Yard and the Blackstone block.

On the tour, we would get to eat pizza at three different pizza places and stop at three different historic taverns.   A scenic ferry ride across the harbor is also included.  The walk would be about 4 miles long, and our guide, Nicole, would fill us in along the way on local history and fun facts.

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Iowa 80- The Worlds Largest Truck Stop and more!

We spent the past few weeks on an unscheduled trip to Forest City, Iowa and the manufacturing facility of Winnebego.  While Iowa was cool and all, we were excited to be back on the road in a fully working coach again.

After contacting our new employer at the KOA in Boston/Cape Cod, and given the go-ahead, we were on the road again heading to our end of summer job in New England.

But we had to make one final stop before we left the state of Iowa.  You see, on the eastern edge of Iowa, not far from the Mississippi River, is the World’s Largest Truckstop!  We had seen it featured on several travel shows and we certainly couldn’t drive right by it without checking it out!

The Iowa 80 Truckstop, established in 1964, features eight restaurants, a convenience store, gift store, Super Truck Showroom, barber shop, chiropractor, dentist, movie theater, workout room, laundry facilities, gas islands, diesel fuel center, truck service center, Truckomat truck wash, Dogomat pet wash, CAT Scale, 24- private showers, trucking museum and more!

Yep.  It’s a small city in one truck stop!

The truck stop itself is set on 220 acres, which is four times larger than the average truck stop.  They receive nearly 5,000 visitors daily in the main building, have parking for 900 trucks, and 150 fuel pumps.

And the store is simply Disney Land for truckers and those that love the industry!  You name it, they had it.

Need a back massage?  They have a Chiropractor for that!  Tooth hurts?  There is a Dentist on call!  Doggies dirty?  Step up to the Dog-O-Mat!

Need a cup that is bigger than your head?  They totally have your back!

Don’t miss the chance to check out the Iowa80 Truck Stop in Walcott, Iowa.  It is well worth the time.  Craziness!

In Indiana and Pennsylvania, we traveled through quite a bit of Amish Country.  This gentleman in the photo above was driving into work.  He apparently worked at the KOA that we were staying at in Mercer/Grove City Pennsylvania!

We are huge fans of Amish cooking.  It’s pretty amazing.  So, of course we stocked up.  Those packages of noodles?  Well they were made in Middlebury, Indiana.  There were several noodle factories, run by the Amish, right nearby!

Soon, our trip took us to our final destination!

This will be our spot for the next several months at the Boston/Cape Cod KOA.  We will be here until just past Columbus Day weekend, as work campers.

We love our tiny spot tucked into the woods!

And finally we can add a little cash to our suffering checkbook!

Our new jobs are in housekeeping!

Dave has always done the laundry, so I used to pride myself in saying that I haven’t done laundry in 25 years.  That is no longer something that I can say.  LOL!

Stay tuned for lots of great photos and sights to see in the Boston Cape Cod area!  We are so excited to finally make it here!

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The SPAM Museum and summer fun!

Well, we’ve spent the last three weeks hanging out in Forest City, Iowa waiting for repairs to our coach.  Arriving just before the July 4th holiday meant that we would have to wait with about 30 other coach owners for our turn and hope that somehow we would get in before all the employees left on holiday.

We watched our name move up on the waiting list, but unfortunately it did not move up fast enough.  We were going to be living in the Winnebago parking lot for the holiday weekend.  And maybe quite a bit longer…

So what to do?

Dave busied himself with repairs that he could do on his own.  Someone’s big butt broke the bed.  That person shall remain nameless.

With the parts department right across the parking lot, things were quite convenient.

I did a bunch of Face Timing with my little granddaughter…

And a bunch of wash…

And we both drove down to Clear Lake to catch the Fourth of July parade.  It was a beautiful day for a parade and a perfect way to make the best of our current situation.

So I did a bit of research to see what else is in the area.  I mean, you can’t go to Iowa without checking out the sites, right?  And about an hour north, just past the Minnesota state line, was something that we definitely needed to see.

The SPAM Museum!

Yes, SPAM is the undisputed king of mystery meat. Made of pig parts and secret spices, cooked in its own cans right on the assembly line, SPAM is an American institution!  And SPAM has its own museum right in Austin, Minnesota.

As you walk into the museum, you are met by a towering wall of SPAM, rising to the ceiling in the lobby.   Very impressive for mystery meat.

SPAM is made by the Hormel company, whose headquarters is also in Austin.  Spam was introduced by Hormel in 1937. At the time it was introduced, it was the only canned meat product on the market that needed no refrigeration.  That made it quite popular during World War II as a staple for the soldiers.

In the museum, you can find displays of vintage cans.  Did you know that Dinty Moore stew was created simply as a way to fill 500,000 empty cans?

A small theater, its doors shaped like the face of a grinning pig, screens a 15 minute SPAM video.

Or you can do what we did and read all the displays.  Lots of great old photos and anything and everything you ever wanted to know about SPAM.

The SPAM museum also has another claim to fame: It’s apparently a great place to get married! On April 25th, 2017, Mark Benson (who legally changed his name to Mark “I Love SPAM” Benson) married Ann Mousley at the SPAM Museum. They traveled all the way from Liverpool, UK to live out their dream wedding.

And I thought I was a bit strange.

Of course, we had to stock up on many flavors of SPAM.  We found them in the gift shop along with most any kind of SPAM souvenir that you could think of.

If you get a chance to get to Austin, Minnesota, be sure to check out the SPAM museum.  Admission is totally free.  And the SPAM, well it is worth the visit.

And finally the coach is repaired!  We are a bunch of happy campers!  We hit the road a few days ago, and are now heading to our job in Boston/Cape Cod.

Stay tuned for lots more!  Who knows.  Maybe they have weird food museums in New England too.

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Full Time RV Living- The Highs and Lows

Three days ago, we hit the road heading to our next destination, Boston/Cape Cod, MA.  It was a rainy day in Atlanta and was going to prove to be a rainy trip to our first stop in Gaffney, SC.  But we were headed out ahead of the tropical storm that would hit the gulf coast the next day.

Upon our arrival in South Carolina,  we discovered that the full wall slide will not go out. Apparently the motor has broken (for the second time in two years). This means that our roughly 400 square foot motorhome is now about half that size.  

Then I dropped an entire glass jar of pickles on the floor resulting in pickles and broken glass everywhere.  The final straw? We forgot Ralph’s insulin in Atlanta. 

We had to unhook the car (did I mention it is pouring rain?), go to Walmart for the insulin and then spend the evening trying to make my coach floor unsticky.

And to think we left this sweet thing to deal with faulty equipment, pickle juice and rainy Walmart runs.

This is our second issue with the slide mechanism on this coach.  Winnebago is aware of the problem.  Apparently the motor which operates the slide is too small for the weight of the full wall slide.  They have solution.  Which means a trip to Iowa to the Winnebago Industries facility.

So there you go.  Plans are changed instantly.  As full timers, we are getting used to the highs and lows of this lifestyle.  With that in mind, I thought I’d put together a list of those highs and lows in order to put this past experience into perspective.  I mean, at least we aren’t stranded on the side of the road, right?  (Knock on wood).

Let’s Start with the Lows

Broken Finger

living full time in a rvThis little incident that happened at our first campground of residence in Bar Harbor, ME.  Word to the wise, don’t wrap the leashes around your finger while walking the dogs.  You see, an errant squirrel can cause quite a bit of havoc.  One little 20 pound dog totally broke my finger.

Medical insurance is not what it used to be.  We are currently on Obamacare and with the latest changes and the fact that we have next to no selection for healthcare, we are limited to seeing only doctors in our home of record- Atlanta, GA.  That doesn’t help us much when we are dealing with a broken finger in Maine.

We ended up paying for this injury in full.  On the bright side, I have to say that the folks at the hospital in Ellsworth are amazingly friendly.

Bad Employment Experiences

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With any job you have to expect that you are not going to get along with everyone.  There will be things you don’t particularly want to do.  There will be days that you won’t want to go to work and days where everything seems to go wrong.

More often than not, those experiences are balanced by good experiences, people that you love to work with, great employers, and beautiful places to work.

We have been lucky in the fact that in the two years that we have been on the road, we have only experienced one place that made us regret our decision to work there.  But I have to say that we learned a whole lot from that experience.

Pet Illness


Our dog Ralph has been through the ringer this past year.  In early 2016, he was diagnosed with bladder stones and diabetes.  He had surgery to remove the stones and then was put on insulin twice a day.

Learning to give him shots was pretty traumatic for both of us.  And getting his diabetes under control was a whole other issue.  It wasn’t long before he went blind.

After much thought, we opted for eye surgery to remove his cataracts.  It took months of recovery and a huge dent in our wallet, but Ralph can now see again, and his diabetes is under control.

Click here for a look at the Highs from the past two years

Taking a break in Georgia

It has been family time in Georgia for the past three months.  I cannot believe that time has passed so quickly.  When we showed up here at the end of March, there weren’t even leaves on the trees.

Now we are in mid summer.  The coach has been parked in my daughter’s driveway snug as a bug, waiting for us to take on our next adventure.  But I have to say that this adventure here has been exciting also!

I mean, just look at the nice backyard that we have gotten to enjoy this summer!

My daughter was concerned that we would have a bit of trouble getting used to living in a regular home for a few months.  So, they prepared a nice little apartment in the basement of their home for us.  We have been quite comfortable here.

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We have the coach right nearby if we need anything, and are able to plug the refrigerator into an outside outlet.  A perfect spot for a few months visit.

Of course, this post will be peppered with baby photos.  The main reason for our visit was our new granddaughter, Esme.  She was born on April 20.

Being grandparents has been a wonderful experience.  Esme is good-natured (with the exception of the occasional evening tantrum), and such a beautiful little girl.

We will miss her so much when we hit the road again.  Life changes sometimes make for even more life changes.  We will roll with it and be visiting Georgia much more often than we have in the past couple of years.

The great thing about our lifestyle is that we are (for the most part), free to decide where and when we will be living.

So what have we been doing these past three months besides loving on that baby?

Well, of course we needed to check out some of our local favorite places to eat.  I mean, you gotta eat, right?  There is nothing better on a hot Georgia day than a raspberry chocolate chip shake from Steak ‘N Shake.

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Back home to Atlanta and a new grandbaby!

We left Tucson in mid March and headed back to Atlanta, GA.  The main reason?  Well, we were expecting the arrival of our first grandchild!  Our trek to Atlanta took us through some great stops and I will definitely take the time to share them with you here over the next few weeks.

When we travel long distances, we like to go with the 3-3-3 Rule.  Basically, it means no more than 3 hours of driving per day; or 300 miles per day; or arrival at a campground no later than 3:00 PM.  Following one of those options each day means that Dave doesn’t get too tired and at the same time, we both get to enjoy the sights along the way.

So the route home to Atlanta took about three weeks, and included stops in Alamogordo, NM; Carlsbad, NM; Galveston, TX; Mobile, AL; and Martin Lake, AL.  Stay tuned for more posts about the sites that we visited along the way!

We parked our coach in my daughter’s driveway and began baby watch.  Meet our daughter, Amanda and her husband, Daniel.  This photo was taken about a week before Esme was born.

Our daughter went into labor on Wednesday and it was wonderful to be there with her for this amazing experience.

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Esmeralda was born on April 20, 2017 at 8:35 AM after a long sleepless night.  She weighed 6 lbs. 1 oz. A beautiful perfect little baby girl!

She looks like a little doll, doesn’t she?  Me?  Well, I look like I’ve been up all night.  But it wasn’t nearly as exhausting for me as her mom!

Baby Esme is a beautiful addition to our family!  She is the first grandchild on my family’s side, and the first girl grandchild on Daniels family’s side.

Did I mention before how excited we are to be here?  That is one of the best advantages of full time RVing!

We will be in Atlanta until around the end of June when we will start our next campground job.  I am currently working on making that one official and will let you know as soon as we have something on paper.

In the meantime, we are enjoying the Atlanta area, our wonderful family and our beautiful granddaughter!

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5 Things to think about before becoming a Full Time RVer

Living in a 400 square foot motor home isn’t for everyone.  When we made this decision about 2 years ago, we weren’t really sure what we were getting into.  All the planning for years in advance does not totally prepare you for the reality.  But we knew that any obstacles would be figured out on the fly.  I mean, you only live once, right?

So we jumped into it with both feet.  Now that two years are behind us, we are so glad we made this life-changing decision.  In an effort to keep things real and help out anyone else who is considering this lifestyle, here are 5 things to think about before you hit the road.

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Downsizing is pretty painful

In order to fit your life into 400 square feet, you have to decide which possessions you can and cannot live without.  Unfortunately, many of them will have to go, especially if your are a full timer that also sells their home like we did.  I have to say that many of our treasured belongings went to people that did not treasure them nearly as much as we did.

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As I talked about in my earlier post “Never Say Free on Facebook“, the hardest thing about simpler living is learning to let go.

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What can you live without?  Well, sometimes it takes a little time to know.  We packed the bottom of our coach with those things we could not part with such as vintage books, golf clubs, various craft supplies and fabric.  We have reached the point now that we will be going through those things again.  What we haven’t used in the two years on the road will find a new place to live.  Downsizing is hard, but it really is freeing.

mount washington new hampshire

Choose a coach with an all-weather package

Coaches are rated for living and traveling in various types of weather.  Unfortunately, that is something we did not know when we bought ours.  Ours is a bit shy on insulation and it really hates cold weather.  Which means that we spend a bit of time each year avoiding cold weather and just like the snowbirds, head south in the winter.

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Even so, places such as Tucson can get cold in the winter.  This year we purchased an electric radiator to help keep the chill out.  But we still have to worry about pipes freezing.

It is best to choose an all weather unit to ensure that it will hold up to temperature differences and be comfortable no matter where you are.

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Choose a RV that works for your lifestyle

I have to say that love our washer and dryer.  I would never want to have to hang out at the laundromat once a week like many of our coworkers do.   We also love the large storage area under the coach.

When planning to hit the road consider what is important to you.  What conveniences you really would love to have.  Because once you are out on the road, those things are not always as easy to come by.

Gadgets make life easier.  Be sure to check out my list of 10 Great Gadgets for the RVer.

Keep the clutter down to a roar

Living in tight quarters involves a bit of organization.  We have two people and two dogs in our coach.  Everything has a place.  Otherwise craziness will ensue.  I’m lying if I say that my RV is always organized, but each day I put in an effort to keep things down to a roar.

I am a professional crafter, and about half of the cabinets in our coach are designated for supplies.  Keeping things organized helps keep us both sane.

What is great is the fact that there is always that amazingly beautiful place right outside our front door to enjoy when things get a little tight inside.

visit to monument valley

Keeping in touch with the rest of the world

I’ll tell you now, most campground wifi is not worth the effort.  Occasionally, you will find a good one, but for the most part, there are too many people trying to access it, too many people trying to stream videos and not enough signal to compensate.

We use our own data most commonly, but that involves having a decent phone signal.  We have actually turned down jobs where a phone signal was not existent.  Because of my websites, this is one area where I cannot compromise.

While life on the road full time can be a major adjustment, we took the chance and have never looked back!

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